vtech db dump and the accountability of parents

The vtech hack has been the under talked story of the week. Until it was revealed today that the hacker had access to hundreds of thousands of files that could contain images of children. Suddenly it exploded, you saw news agencies that would not cover this story all over it.

Broken by Motherboard and Troy Hunt is that fact that vtech (the mfg. of choice for cheap LAN line phones) and line of children’s toys had been hacked. While the information currently (2015-12-01) has yet to be sold or traded to the level I have seen. It has really started to garner the wrong attention for the wrong reason.

Before I go any further, yes children should be protected, and yes vtech messed up. But it was how this happened should be considered. As stated in previous articles “assume everything that is encrypted will be decrypted, expect everything that is secret will be known” And with dealing with kids, there is no exceptions to this rule. The main goal is to ensure those items (photos, chat logs of children) never exist in the first place.

So let’s step back for a second.

Imagine this, vtech asks their IT dept. to set up a DB and some kind of web UI that allows kids to play games and interact with their toys. They use simplistic MD5 encryption because they figure, hey who will want to hack this? Kids don’t have this kind of knowhow. Then months later marketing sees how well received the online games are and then ask the IT team to set up a system the hardware engineers need for shipping a product that allows kids to send photos to their parents, communicate and so on. Code is reused from the original product without thought the fact that the content they are encrypting will carry a higher weight in privacy then before.

Is this their fault? Yes. But not just theirs.

Parents… were an important part of this process. The sign up required that requires parents to be a part of that Troy Hunt covers in his well-written article. The amount of trust they put into vtech was unwarranted and unfair to them. However it bears the heavy burden of a good lesson. Don’t trust a private company with private information of your child. If we can’t keep our affairs on Ashley Madison secret then how can we expect more for a child? For some parents they don’t want to give their children phones or unmonitored internet access to kids 4 to 9 years of age (the recommended age for this product from amazon.com). So why give them access to products that allow malicious hackers access to view photos of your kids?

I neglected to write an article about this for a number of days due to the fact it was just yet another data leak. But the fact that innocent kids images have been included in the leak I feel it crossed a line. No one liked public data leaks, more so when they are in them. But some companies fail to yield to the warning given to them by the exploiter even when given in good faith. Thus they feel they must leak the data in order to make a point to keep more malicious users away. I hope for the sake of the kids this leak does not get more public than it already has.

So what’s the solution?

vtech should have built in a higher level of cryptography and level of privacy (i.e. obscuring the children’s information in their DB) before it was rolled out. In something more secure than MD5, this algorithm has been around since 1991 with its first flaw found in 1996. The crypto should have been stronger. It’s sad to think that the protection built into the forum you use to buy car parts for your 1992 Honda civic is higher held than the one that allows you to talk and see your children.

The parents, this is tough one as it requires absolute vigilance on the parents end, and how can you trust the thousands upon thousands of vendors out there. The fact of the matter is you can’t, and you don’t have to. Just make judgement calls on product such as: Does my 4 your old really understand the complications of their toy being on wifi all the time? No? Then maybe I should look into something else.

It’s hard to be a parent, but with the season for giving to the ones we love, we should not avoid items that flash or are from the future, or are even from vtech. We should avoid placing the items in our kids hands that all people of a malicious nature to take over.

In ending this is not call for you to put your children in tinfoil hats, or to walk to vtech and burn down their offices but rather a word warning. The internet holds a lot of information that kids, adults, and even computers can learn from. We should not limit it, nor should we fear it. We just need to be aware of the weight of putting what we don’t want into it knowing someday it might just come back out.

 

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